4 questions you don’t expect in an interview

Most interviewers assume that the candidate is showing up having done a bit of preparation.


They (hopefully!) have researched the company and understand the role they are applying for.

Maybe they have been practicing some sample questions, such as “Why should we hire you?,” or “What can you offer to the company?”


But what about when the interviewer throws out an unexpected question?


Being put on the spot is the time when a candidate truly has to perform. This also offers the interviewer a good opportunity to discern potential employees from applicants.


Want to stay ahead of the game? Prepare to be asked these questions:


How will you fail at your job?


We like to talk about our strengths or give evidence of everything we are good at and can complete competently.


But employers want to know how you cope with failure: do you embrace it as a chance to grow and learn, or do you fear it and sit inside your comfort zone to avoid failing?


The answer can indicate a lot about you as an employee and employers are often looking for specific traits in this regard.


How would a previous boss or fellow co-worker describe you?


It is important to have a high degree of self-awareness and an understanding of ourselves, our traits, and the way we come across to others.


Knowing how others perceive us and making sure that we are presenting ourselves the way we want to show up is important for personal development and in maintaining professionalism.


Employers aren’t as interested in the traits a co-worker may say you have, but in your work ethic, commitment, reliability, and how you treat the company and people that support you.


What was the last thing you did to further your education?


No matter what line of work you are in, continuing education is critical to stay ahead in your industry.


Failure to take a proactive role in learning and development means you will fall behind with industry knowledge and out of touch with advancements.


Many people are aware of this need, and research shows a 10% growth in distance education from 2015 to 2016.


The access to courses online currently is like it has never been before, and failure to take advantage of it will likely mean failure to get the job you are after.


Can you offer a story or example that speaks to your values?


Future employers can glean a lot from an individuals’ values and philosophies, and use this to better understand how the potential employee would meld with the values of the company and the team mentality that the company upholds.


Failure to be able to articulate your values doesn’t bode well for a company that is looking for someone to help them grow and develop in line with unique brand-specific philosophies that help them stand out.


Source: Thanks for mastiffstaffing.com

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